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Relative Sea Level Trend

stationid city, state


The relative sea level trend is #trendmmyr millimeters/year with a 95% confidence
interval of +/- #sterrmmy mm/yr based on monthly mean sea level data from
#startyear to #endyear which is equivalent to a change of feet in 100 years.

The plot shows the monthly mean sea level without the regular seasonal fluctuations due to coastal ocean temperatures, salinities, winds, atmospheric pressures, and ocean currents. The long-term linear trend is also shown, including its 95% confidence interval. The plotted values are relative to the most recent Mean Sea Level datum established by CO-OPS. The calculated trends for all stations are available as a table in millimeters/year and in feet/century (0.3 meters = 1 foot). If present, solid vertical lines indicate times of any major earthquakes in the vicinity of the station and dashed vertical lines bracket any periods of questionable data or datum shift.

Interannual Variation

stationid City, State


The plot shows the interannual variation of monthly mean sea level and the 5-month running average. The average seasonal cycle and linear sea level trend have been removed. Interannual variation is caused by irregular fluctuations in coastal ocean temperatures, salinities, winds, atmospheric pressures, and ocean currents. The interannual variation for many Pacific stations is closely related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). If present, solid vertical lines indicate times of any major earthquakes in the vicinity of the station and dashed vertical lines bracket any periods of questionable data or datum shifts.

Interannual Variation Since 1990

stationid City, State


The plot shows the interannual variation of monthly mean sea level and the 5-month running average. The average seasonal cycle and linear sea level trend have been removed. Interannual variation is caused by irregular fluctuations in coastal ocean temperatures, salinities, winds, atmospheric pressures, and ocean currents. The interannual variation for many Pacific stations is closely related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). If present, solid vertical lines indicate times of any major earthquakes in the vicinity of the station and dashed vertical lines bracket any periods of questionable data or datum shifts.

Average Seasonal Cycle

stationid City, State


The average seasonal cycle of mean sea level, caused by regular fluctuations in coastal temperatures, salinities, winds, atmospheric pressures, and ocean currents, is shown along with each month's 95% confidence interval. For local and regional comparisons, the calculated average seasonal values for all non CO-OPS and CO-OPS Stations are available as tables in meters.

Variation of 50-Year Relative Sea Level Trends

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Linear relative sea level trends were calculated in overlapping 50-year increments for stations with sufficient historical data. The variation of each 50-year trend, with 95% confidence interval, is plotted against the mid-year of each 50-year period. The solid horizontal line represents the linear relative sea level trend using the entire period of record.

Variation of 50-Year Relative Sea Level Trends
1612340
Honolulu, Hawaii
1617760
Hilo, Hawaii
2695540
Bermuda, Atlantic Ocean,
8410140
Eastport, Maine
8418150
Portland, Maine
8443970
Boston, Massachusetts
8447930
Woods Hole, Massachusetts
8452660
Newport, Rhode Island
8516945
Kings Point, New York
8518750
The Battery, New York
8531680
Sandy Hook, New Jersey
8534720
Atlantic City, New Jersey
8545240
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
8557380
Lewes, Delaware
8574680
Baltimore, Maryland
8575512
Annapolis, Maryland
8594900
Washington, District of Columbia
8638610
Sewells Point, Virginia
8658120
Wilmington, North Carolina
8665530
Charleston, South Carolina
8670870
Fort Pulaski, Georgia
8720030
Fernandina Beach, Florida
8720218
Mayport, Florida
8724580
Key West, Florida
8727520
Cedar Key, Florida
8729840
Pensacola, Florida
8771450
Galveston Pier 21, Texas
9410170
San Diego, California
9410230
La Jolla, California
9410660
Los Angeles, California
9410840
Santa Monica, California
9414290
San Francisco, California
9419750
Crescent City, California
9439040
Astoria, Oregon
9443090
Neah Bay, Washington
9447130
Seattle, Washington
9449880
Friday Harbor, Washington
9450460
Ketchikan, Alaska
9451600
Sitka, Alaska
9452210
Juneau, Alaska

Previous Relative Sea Level Trends

stationid City, State

As more data are collected at water level stations, the linear relative sea level trends can be recalculated each year. The figure compares linear relative sea level trends and 95% confidence intervals calculated from the beginning of the station record to recent years. The values do not indicate the trend in each year, but the trend of the entire data period up to that year.


Although the trend may vary with the end year, there is no statistically significant difference between the calculated trends if their 95% confidence intervals overlap. Therefore, the most recent calculated trend is not necessarily more accurate than the previous trends; it is merely a little more precise. If several recent years have anomalously high or low water levels, the values may actually move slightly away from the true long-term linear trend.

The main effect of including a few more years of data is to narrow the 95% confidence intervals. The figure below (from Sea Level Variations of the United States 1854-2006, NOAA Technical Report NOS CO-OPS 53) shows estimated widths of the 95% confidence intervals derived from all the calculated trends at long-term CO-OPS water level stations. A 30-year data set should provide a trend with a +/- 1.5 mm/yr confidence interval; a 60-year data set should provide a trend with a +/- 0.5 mm/yr confidence interval.

conf95.png

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There are no additional products available for the non-CO-OPS global station: 190-051 , .

Revised: 10/15/2013
NOAA / National Ocean Service
Web site owner: Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services